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Audit Risk – CPA Exam

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AUDIT RISK
Problem:
1. As the acceptable level of detection risk decreases, an auditor may
a. Reduce substantive testing by relying on the assessments of inherent risk and control risk.
b. Postpone the planned timing of substantive tests from interim dates to the year-end.
c. Eliminate the assessed level of inherent risk from consideration as a planning factor.
d. Lower the assessed level of control risk from the maximum level to below the maximum.

Answer & Explanation:
1. (b) The requirement is to determine a likely auditor reaction to a decreased acceptable level of detection risk. Answer (b) is correct because postponement of interim substantive tests to year-end decreases detection risk by reducing the risk for the period subsequent to the performance of those tests; other approaches to decreasing detection risk include changing to more effective substantive tests and increasing their extent. Answer (a) is incorrect because increased, not reduced, substantive testing is required. Answer (c) is incorrect because inherent risk must be considered in planning, either by itself or in combination with control risk. Answer (d) is incorrect because tests of controls must be performed to reduce the assessed level of control risk.

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Problem:
2. The risk that an auditor will conclude, based on substantive tests, that a material misstatement does not exist in an account balance when, in fact, such misstatement does exist is referred to as
a. Sampling risk.
b. Detection risk.
c. Nonsampling risk.
d. Inherent risk.

Answer & Explanation:
2. (b) The requirement is to identify the risk that an auditor will conclude, based on substantive tests, that a material error does not exist in an account balance when, infact, such error does exist. Answer (b) is correct because detection risk is the risk that the auditor will not detect a material misstatement that exists in an assertion. Detection risk may be viewed in terms of two components (1) the risk that analytical procedures and other relevant substantive tests would fail to detect misstatements equal to tolerablemisstatement, and (2) the allowable risk of incorrect acceptance for the substantive tests of details. Answer (a) is incorrect because sampling risk arises from the possibility that, when a test of controls or a substantive test is restricted to a sample, the auditor’s conclusions may be different from the conclusions he or she would reach if the tests were applied in the same way to all items in the account balance or class of transactions. When related to substantive tests sampling risk is only a part of the risk that the auditor’s substantive tests will not detect a material misstatement. Answer (c) is incorrect because nonsampling risk includes only those aspects of audit risk that are not due to sampling. Answer (d) is incorrect because inherent risk is the susceptibilityof an assertion to a material misstatement, assuming that there are no related controls.

Problem:
3. As the acceptable level of detection risk decreases, the assurance directly provided from
a. Substantive tests should increase.
b. Substantive tests should decrease.
c. Tests of controls should increase.
d. Tests of controls should decrease.

Answer & Explanation:
3. (a) The requirement is to identify an effect of a decrease in the acceptable level of detection risk. Answer (a) is correct because as the acceptable level of detection risk decreases, the assurance provided from substantive tests should increase. To gain this increased assurance the auditors may (1) change the nature of substantive tests to more effective procedures (e.g., use independent parties outside the entity rather than those within the entity), (2) change the timing of substantive tests (e.g., perform them at year-end rather than at an interim date), and (3) change the extent of substantive tests (e.g., take a larger sample). Answer (b) is incorrect because the assurance provided from substantive tests increases, it does not decrease. Answers (c) and (d) are incorrect because the acceptable level of detection risk is based largely on the assessed levels of control risk and inherent risk. Accordingly, any tests of controls will already have been performed.

Problem:
5. Inherent risk and control risk differ from detection risk in that they
a. Arise from the misapplication of auditing procedures.
b. May be assessed in either quantitative or nonquantitative terms.
c. Exist independently of the financial statement audit.
d. Can be changed at the auditor’s discretion.

Answer & Explanation:
5. (c) The requirement is to determine a manner in which inherent risk and control risk differ from detection risk. Answer (c) is correct because inherent risk and control risk exist independently of the audit of the financial statements as functions of the client and its environment, whereas detection risk relates to the auditor’s procedures and can be changed at his or her discretion. Answer (a) is incorrect because inherent risk and control risk are functions of the client and its environment and do not arise from misapplication of auditing procedures. Answer (b) is incorrect because inherent risk, control risk and detection risk may each be assessed in either quantitative or nonquantitative terms. Answer (d) is incorrect because inherent risk and control risk are functions of the client and its environment, they cannot be changed at the auditor’s discretion. However, the assessed levels of inherent and control risk (not addressed in this question) may be affected by auditor decisions relating to the cost of gathering evidence to substantiate assessed levels below the maximum.

Problem:
6. On the basis of the audit evidence gathered and evaluated, an auditor decides to increase the assessed level of control risk from that originally planned. To achieve an overall audit risk level that is substantially the same as the planned audit risk level, the auditor would
a. Decrease substantive testing.
b. Decrease detection risk.
c. Increase inherent risk.
d. Increase materiality levels.

Answer & Explanation:
6. (b) The requirement is to determine the best way for an auditor to achieve an overall audit risk level when the audit evidence relating to control risk indicates the need to increase its assessed level. Answer (b) is correct because a decrease in detection risk will allow the auditor achieve an overall audit risk level substantially the same as planned. Answer (a) is incorrect because a decrease in substantive testing will increase, not decrease, detection risk and thereby increase audit risk. Answer (c) is incorrect because an increase in inherent risk will also increase audit risk. Answer (d) is incorrect because there appears to be no justification for increasing materiality levels beyond those used in planning the audit.

Problem:
7. Relationship between control risk and detection risk is ordinarily
a. Parallel.
b. Inverse.
c. Direct.
d. Equal.

Answer & Explanation:
7. (b) The requirement is to determine the relationship between control risk and detection risk. Inverse is correct because as control risk increases (decreases) detection risk must decrease (increase).

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Apr 24, 2009 at 2:31 am

    They are very good examples and very good explainations.

    This will help me pass my audit exam (Australia).
    Thanks for your website!

    Kind Regards

    Linda

  2. Nov 8, 2009 at 3:55 am

    Thanks for these sample questions. Kinda good explanations.

  3. ahmed

    Oct 27, 2010 at 6:50 am

    Thank you for these questions. good explanations
    we wait more.

  4. Jan 16, 2011 at 7:18 am

    I am preparing for Advanced Audit and Assurance exams (ICAN). I have been searching for additional materials to further ease my understanding of the subject. Indeed, the 7 major phases of Audit has simplified the entire syllabus.

    Thank you for this material and others

  5. Mary Edward Temba

    Feb 6, 2011 at 11:58 am

    These notes have helped me a lot in answering my first degree exams.Thanks for the nice materials.May i have your email if possible?

  6. nick

    May 21, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    Great questions, they are released by the AICPA and taken directly from their website… there are hundreds more there too from 2005-2010

  7. Steven Benedict

    May 25, 2011 at 2:31 pm

    That’s practical wonderfully, good questions always need good answers.

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